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I-L-X: A TO Z

Interactive Learning eXperiences: the backstage capabilities in 26 words


John Beck - Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Development-based: redo levels or episodes as often as necessary to master the material

The point of education built around knowledge-acquisition (which is what almost ALL of our educational is designed to do) should be “getting knowledge.”  That sounds like a tautology – and it is. But it needs to be stated loudly and clearly. Currently, too much of the system is about assessing short-term memorization within a specified time limit.  That is not knowledge—that is test-taking.

Let me illustrate what education should REALLY be with a story from my family.  My son with Down Syndrome will never do better on a “knowledge test” than I do – I am really good at the strategies for excelling on standardized tests even when I have not really stored any long-term knowledge. My brain just processes that kind of information better than my son’s ever will. 

But even as a young teenager, my son would ALWAYS beat me at any number of video games – games that I played often with him.  It took him much longer to master those games than an average teen, but there was no time (or re-play) limit on his learning the behaviors necessary to score really well – behaviors that can and do translate to real life.

I believe that is a good model of good education.

Students of any age, education level, or learning ability can take as much time as they need with Interactive Learning eXperiences (I-L-Xs) to master both the knowledge and the behaviors necessary to be much better business strategists.  There is no limit to the number of plays or the number of failures.  Basically, try out everything and see how it works.  And because these are stand-alone and not designed as “exercises” slotted into a regular time delimited course (how industrial-revolution is the fact that we still measure educational credits in hours?????), learners’ brains have as much time as needed to absorb the lessons and patterns to succeed.

When will our current systems of education learn that they are much more designed for the teachers than for the students?


image: flickr/ArsElectronica